SAS - Hospital Infanta Elena

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  • Publication
    Predictive factors of six-week mortality in critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2: A multicenter prospective study.
    (2022) Estella, Á; Garcia Garmendia, J L; de la Fuente, C; Machado Casas, J F; Yuste, M E; Amaya Villar, R; Estecha, M A; Yaguez Mateos, L; Cantón Bulnes, M L; Loza, A; Mora, J; Fernández Ruiz, L; Díez Del Corral Fernández, B; Rojas Amezcua, M; Rodriguez Higueras, M I; Díaz Torres, I; Recuerda Núñez, M; Zaheri Beryanaki, M; Rivera Espinar, F; Matallana Zapata, D F; Moreno Cano, S G; Gimenez Beltrán, B; Muñoz, N; Sainz de Baranda Piñero, A; Bustelo Bueno, P; Moreno Barriga, E; Rios Toro, J J; Pérez Ruiz, M; Gómez González, C; Breval Flores, A; de San José Bermejo Gómez, A; Ruiz Cabello Jimenez, M A; Guerrero Marín, M; Ortega Ordiales, A; Tejero-Aranguren, J; Rodriguez Mejías, C; Gomez de Oña, J; de la Hoz, C; Ocaña Fernández, D; Ibañez Cuadros, S; Garnacho Montero, J; Work Group of Infectious Disease (GTEI) de la Sociedad Andaluza de Medicina Intensiva y Unidades coronarias SAMIUC
    The objective of the study is to identify the risk factors associated with mortality at six weeks, especially by analyzing the role of antivirals and munomodulators. Prospective descriptive multicenter cohort study. 26 Intensive care units (ICU) from Andalusian region in Spain. Consecutive critically ill patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were included from March 8 to May 30. None. Variables analyzed were demographic, severity scores and clinical condition. Support therapy, drug and mortality were analyzed. An univariate followed by multivariate Cox regression with propensity score analysis was applied. 495 patients were enrolled, but 73 of them were excluded for incomplete data. Thus, 422 patients were included in the final analysis. Median age was 63 years and 305 (72.3%) were men. ICU mortality: 144/422 34%; 14 days mortality: 81/422 (19.2%); 28 days mortality: 121/422 (28.7%); 6-week mortality 152/422 36.5%. By multivariable Cox proportional analysis, factors independently associated with 42-day mortality were age, APACHE II score, SOFA score at ICU admission >6, Lactate dehydrogenase at ICU admission >470U/L, Use of vasopressors, extrarenal depuration, %lymphocytes 72h post-ICU admission 6, Lactate dehydrogenase at ICU admission >470U/L, Use of vasopressors, extrarenal depuration, %lymphocytes 72h post-ICU admission 470U/L, Use of vasopressors, extrarenal depuration, %lymphocytes 72h post-ICU admission Age, APACHE II, SOFA>value of 6 points, along with vasopressor requirements or renal replacement therapy have been identified as predictor factors of mortality at six weeks. Administration of corticosteroids showed no benefits in mortality, as did treatment with tocilizumab. Lopinavir/ritonavir administration is identified as a protective factor.
  • Publication
    Postpneumonectomy Syndrome in a Patient With Swyer-James-MacLeod Syndrome
    (Elsevier espana slu, 2022-04-01) Benito Bernaldez, Cristina; Mora Jurado, Antonia; Almadana Pacheco, Virginia; [Benito Bernaldez, Cristina] Hosp Univ Virgen Macarena, Serv Neumol, Seville, Spain; [Almadana Pacheco, Virginia] Hosp Univ Virgen Macarena, Serv Neumol, Seville, Spain; [Mora Jurado, Antonia] Hosp Infanta Elena, Serv Radiodiagnost, Huelva, Spain
  • Publication
    Analysis of blood markers for early colorectal cancer diagnosis.
    (2022) Bayo Calero, Juan; Castaño López, Miguel Angel; Casado Monge, Pedro Germán; Díaz Portillo, Jacobo; Bejarano García, Ana; Navarro Roldán, Francisco
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common tumor worldwide. Its mortality can be limited by early diagnosis through screening programs. These programs are based on fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy. Our objective was to find a model based on the determination of blood biomarkers that was efficacious enough to become part of the early diagnosis of CRC. In a total of 221 patients who underwent a colonoscopy, two types of markers were identified (I) classic: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA19.9, α-fetoprotein, CA125, CA72.4, and ferritin; and (II) experimental: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), estimated glomerular filtration rate (EGFR), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), calprotectin, and cysteine-rich 61 (Cyr61). We divided the patients into four groups according to colonoscopy results: a control group (n=83) with normal colonoscopy, a polyp group (n=56), a CRC group (n=45), and an inflammatory disease group (n=37). We built an algorithm based on multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 51.6% were males, and the median age was 63 years. We designed an algorithm based on the combination of several markers that discriminated CRC patients from the rest of the patients with a performance of 94%, a sensitivity of 95.6%, and a specificity of 80.6%. Discriminating by sex also resulted in two powerful algorithms, although it performed better in males (97% vs. 91%). Our study has devised a predictive model with high efficacy based on the determination of several biomarkers. We think that it could be incorporated into the set of methods used in CRC screening.
  • Publication
    Cutaneous reactions after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination: a cross-sectional Spanish nationwide study of 405 cases.
    (2021-09-21) Català, A; Muñoz-Santos, C; Galván-Casas, C; Roncero Riesco, M; Revilla Nebreda, D; Solá-Truyols, A; Giavedoni, P; Llamas-Velasco, M; González-Cruz, C; Cubiró, X; Ruíz-Villaverde, R; Gómez-Armayones, S; Gil Mateo, M P; Pesqué, D; Marcantonio, O; Fernández-Nieto, D; Romaní, J; Iglesias Pena, N; Carnero Gonzalez, L; Tercedor-Sanchez, J; Carretero, G; Masat-Ticó, T; Rodríguez-Jiménez, P; Gimenez-Arnau, A M; Utrera-Busquets, M; Vargas Laguna, E; Angulo Menéndez, A G; San Juan Lasser, E; Iglesias-Sancho, M; Alonso Naranjo, L; Hiltun, I; Cutillas Marco, E; Polimon Olabarrieta, I; Marinero Escobedo, S; García-Navarro, X; Calderón Gutiérrez, M J; Baeza-Hernández, G; Bou Camps, L; Toledo-Pastrana, T; Guilabert, A
    Cutaneous reactions after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines are poorly characterized. To describe and classify cutaneous reactions after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. A nationwide Spanish cross-sectional study was conducted. We included patients with cutaneous reactions within 21 days of any dose of the approved vaccines at the time of the study. After a face-to-face visit with a dermatologist, information on cutaneous reactions was collected via an online professional survey and clinical photographs were sent by email. Investigators searched for consensus on clinical patterns and classification. From 16 February to 15 May 2021, we collected 405 reactions after vaccination with the BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech; 40·2%), mRNA-1273 (Moderna; 36·3%) and AZD1222 (AstraZeneca; 23·5%) vaccines. Mean patient age was 50·7 years and 80·2% were female. Cutaneous reactions were classified as injection site ('COVID arm', 32·1%), urticaria (14·6%), morbilliform (8·9%), papulovesicular (6·4%), pityriasis rosea-like (4·9%) and purpuric (4%) reactions. Varicella zoster and herpes simplex virus reactivations accounted for 13·8% of reactions. The COVID arm was almost exclusive to women (95·4%). The most reported reactions in each vaccine group were COVID arm (mRNA-1273, Moderna, 61·9%), varicella zoster virus reactivation (BNT162b2, Pfizer-BioNTech, 17·2%) and urticaria (AZD1222, AstraZeneca, 21·1%). Most reactions to the mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vaccine were described in women (90·5%). Eighty reactions (21%) were classified as severe/very severe and 81% required treatment. Cutaneous reactions after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination are heterogeneous. Most are mild-to-moderate and self-limiting, although severe/very severe reactions are reported. Knowledge of these reactions during mass vaccination may help healthcare professionals and reassure patients.
  • Publication
    A resilient type of familial hypercholesterolaemia: case-control follow-up of genetically characterized older patients in the SAFEHEART cohort.
    (2022) Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Watts, Gerald F; Muñiz-Grijalvo, Ovidio; Díaz-Díaz, Jose Luis; Alonso, Rodrigo; Zambón, Daniel; Fuentes-Jimenez, Francisco; Mauri, Marta; Padró, Teresa; Vidal-Pardo, José I; Barba, Miguel A; Ruiz-Pérez, Enrique; Michán, Alfredo; Mediavilla, Juan D; Hernandez, Antonio M; Romero-Jimenez, Manuel J; Badimon, Lina; Mata, Pedro; SAFEHEART Investigators
    Knowledge of the features of patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) who are protected from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is important for the clinical and prognostic care of this apparently high-risk condition. Our aim was to investigate the determinant and characteristics of patients with FH who are protected from ASCVD and have normal life expectancy, so-called 'resilient' FH (R-FH). Spanish Familial Hypercholesterolaemia cohort study (SAFEHEART) is an open, multicentre, nation-wide, long-term prospective cohort study in genetically defined patients with heterozygous FH in Spain. Patients in the registry who at the time of analysis were at least 65 years or those who would have reached that age had they not died from an ASCVD event were analysed as a case-control study. Resilient FH was defined as the presence of a pathogenic mutation causative of FH in a patient aged ≥65 years without clinical ASCVD. Nine hundred and thirty registrants with FH met the study criteria. A defective low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor mutation, higher plasma level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), younger age, female gender, absence of hypertension, and lower plasma lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] concentration were independently predictive of R-FH. In a second model, higher levels of HDL-C and lower 10-year score in SAFEHEART-RE were also independently predictive of R-FH. Resilient FH may be typified as being female and having a defective LDL-receptor mutation, higher levels of plasma HDL-C, lower levels of Lp(a), and an absence of hypertension. The implications of this type of FH for clinical practice guidelines and the value for service design and optional care of FH remains to be established. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02693548.
  • Publication
    V-032 INTRAOPERATIVE BLEEDING AFTER SUGARBAKER REPARATION: HOW CAN I SOLVE IT ??
    (Oxford univ press, 2022-10-13) Delgado Morales, M. M.; Ramirez Redondo, A.; Licardie Bolanos, E.; Bascuas Rodrigo, B.; Guadalajara Jurado, J. F.; [Delgado Morales, M. M.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Ramirez Redondo, A.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Licardie Bolanos, E.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Bascuas Rodrigo, B.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Guadalajara Jurado, J. F.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen Surg, Huelva, Spain
  • Publication
    P-143 INTRAOPERATIVE FLUORESCENCE ANGIOGRAPHY WITH INDOCYANINE GREEN (ICG) IN EMERGENCY LAPAROSCOPIC HERNIA REPAIR
    (Oxford univ press, 2022-10-13) Bascuas, B.; Licardie, E.; Ramirez, A.; Guadalajara, J.; [Bascuas, B.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Licardie, E.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Ramirez, A.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Guadalajara, J.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain
  • Publication
    V-019 LAPAROSCOPIC CONTROL OF HEMOPERITONEUM AFTER TACKER FIXATION IN TAPP HERNIA REPAIR
    (Oxford univ press, 2022-10-13) Ramirez, A.; Bascuas, B.; Delgado, M.; Licardie, E.; Guadalajara, J.; [Ramirez, A.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Bascuas, B.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Delgado, M.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Licardie, E.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain; [Guadalajara, J.] Infanta Elena Hosp, Gen & Digest Surg, Huelva, Spain
  • Publication
    A One Health view of the West Nile virus outbreak in Andalusia (Spain) in 2020.
    (2022) Figuerola, Jordi; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Ángel; Ruíz-López, María José; Llorente, Francisco; Ruiz, Santiago; Hoefer, Andreas; Aguilera-Sepúlveda, Pilar; Jiménez-Peñuela, Jéssica; García-Ruiz, Olaya; Herrero, Laura; Soriguer, Ramón C; Fernández Delgado, Raúl; Sánchez-Seco, María Paz; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Vázquez, Ana
    Reports of West Nile virus (WNV) associated disease in humans were scarce in Spain until summer 2020, when 77 cases were reported, eight fatal. Most cases occurred next to the Guadalquivir River in the Sevillian villages of Puebla del Río and Coria del Río. Detection of WNV disease in humans was preceded by a large increase in the abundance of Culex perexiguus in the neighbourhood of the villages where most human cases occurred. The first WNV infected mosquitoes were captured approximately one month before the detection of the first human cases. Overall, 33 positive pools of Cx. perexiguus and one pool of Culex pipiens were found. Serology of wild birds confirmed WNV circulation inside the affected villages, that transmission to humans also occurred in urban settings and suggests that virus circulation was geographically more widespread than disease cases in humans or horses may indicate. A high prevalence of antibodies was detected in blackbirds (Turdus merula) suggesting that this species played an important role in the amplification of WNV in urban areas. Culex perexiguus was the main vector of WNV among birds in natural and agricultural areas, while its role in urban areas needs to be investigated in more detail. Culex pipiens may have played some role as bridge vector of WNV between birds and humans once the enzootic transmission cycle driven by Cx. perexiguus occurred inside the villages. Surveillance of virus in mosquitoes has the potential to detect WNV well in advance of the first human cases.
  • Publication
    Helicobacter pylori Antibody Reactivities and Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Case-control Study in Spain
    (Frontiers media sa, 2017-05-29) Fernandez de Larrea-Baz, Nerea; Michel, Angelika; Romero, Beatriz; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Moreno, Victor; Martin, Vicente; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Jimenez-Moleon, Jose J.; Castilla, Jesus; Tardon, Adonina; Ruiz, Irune; Peiro, Rosana; Tejada, Antonio; Chirlaque, Maria D.; Butt, Julia A.; Olmedo-Requena, Rocio; Gomez-Acebo, Ines; Linares, Pedro; Boldo, Elena; Castells, Antoni; Pawlita, Michael; Castano-Vinyals, Gemma; Kogevinas, Manolis; de Sanjose, Silvia; Pollan, Marina; del Campo, Rosa; Waterboer, Tim; Aragones, Nuria; [Fernandez de Larrea-Baz, Nerea] Inst Salud Carlos III, Area Natl Ctr Epidemiol, Environm & Canc Epidemiol Area, Madrid, Spain; [Perez-Gomez, Beatriz] Inst Salud Carlos III, Area Natl Ctr Epidemiol, Environm & Canc Epidemiol Area, Madrid, Spain; [Aragones, Nuria] Inst Salud Carlos III, Area Natl Ctr Epidemiol, Environm & Canc Epidemiol Area, Madrid, Spain; [Fernandez de Larrea-Baz, Nerea] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Jimenez-Moleon, Jose J.] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Castilla, Jesus] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Tardon, Adonina] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Peiro, Rosana] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Chirlaque, Maria D.] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Olmedo-Requena, Rocio] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Gomez-Acebo, Ines] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Boldo, Elena] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Castano-Vinyals, Gemma] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Kogevinas, Manolis] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [de Sanjose, Silvia] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Pollan, Marina] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Aragones, Nuria] CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Madrid, Spain; [Michel, Angelika] German Canc Res Ctr, Div Mol Diagnost Oncogen Infect Infect Inflammat, Heidelberg, Germany; [Butt, Julia A.] German Canc Res Ctr, Div Mol Diagnost Oncogen Infect Infect Inflammat, Heidelberg, Germany; [Pawlita, Michael] German Canc Res Ctr, Div Mol Diagnost Oncogen Infect Infect Inflammat, Heidelberg, Germany; [Waterboer, Tim] German Canc Res Ctr, Div Mol Diagnost Oncogen Infect Infect Inflammat, Heidelberg, Germany; [Perez-Gomez, Beatriz] Ramon & Cajal Univ Hosp IRYCIS, Dept Microbiol, Madrid, Spain; [del Campo, Rosa] Ramon & Cajal Univ Hosp IRYCIS, Dept Microbiol, Madrid, Spain; [Perez-Gomez, Beatriz] IIS Puerta Hierro, Puerta Hierro Hlth Res Inst, Canc Epidemiol Res Grp Oncol & Hematol Area, Madrid, Spain; [Boldo, Elena] IIS Puerta Hierro, Puerta Hierro Hlth Res Inst, Canc Epidemiol Res Grp Oncol & Hematol Area, Madrid, Spain; [Pollan, Marina] IIS Puerta Hierro, Puerta Hierro Hlth Res Inst, Canc Epidemiol Res Grp Oncol & Hematol Area, Madrid, Spain; [Moreno, Victor] Hosp Llobregat, Catalan Inst Oncol, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain; [Moreno, Victor] Univ Barcelona, Fac Med, Dept Clin Sci, Barcelona, Spain; [Moreno, Victor] Hosp Llobregat, Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Colorectal Canc Grp, Barcelona, Spain; [Martin, Vicente] Univ Leon, Res Grp Gene Environm & Hlth Interact, Leon, Spain; [Martin, Vicente] Univ Leon, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Biomed Sci, Area Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Leon, Spain; [Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad] Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol & Computat Biol, Santander, Spain; [Jimenez-Moleon, Jose J.] Inst Invest Biosanitaria Granada, Granada Hlth Res Inst ibs GRANADA, Granada, Spain; [Olmedo-Requena, Rocio] Inst Invest Biosanitaria Granada, Granada Hlth Res Inst ibs GRANADA, Granada, Spain; [Jimenez-Moleon, Jose J.] Univ Granada, Dept Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Granada, Spain; [Olmedo-Requena, Rocio] Univ Granada, Dept Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Granada, Spain; [Castilla, Jesus] Inst Salud Publ Navarra, IdiSNA Navarra Inst Hlth Res, Pamplona, Spain; [Tardon, Adonina] Univ Oviedo, Oncol Inst, Dept Med, Mol Epidemiol Canc Unit, Oviedo, Spain; [Ruiz, Irune] Donostia Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Donostia San Sebastian, Spain; [Peiro, Rosana] Fdn Promot Hlth & Biomed Res Valencia Reg FISABIO, Fdn La Fomento Invest Sanitaria & Biomed Comunita, Valencia, Spain; [Tejada, Antonio] Huelva Univ, Hosp Complex, Dept Gen Surg, Coloproctol Unit, Huelva, Spain; [Chirlaque, Maria D.] IMIB Arrixaca, Reg Hlth Council, Dept Epidemiol, Murcia, Spain; [Chirlaque, Maria D.] Univ Murcia, Dept Hlth & Social Sci, Murcia, Spain; [Linares, Pedro] Univ Leon, Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol Complejo Asis, Leon, Spain; [Castells, Antoni] Hosp Clin Barcelona, Gastroenterol Dept, Barcelona, Spain; [Castells, Antoni] Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain; [Castells, Antoni] CIBER Enfermed Hepat & Digestivas CIBEREHD, CIBER Liver & Digest Dis, Madrid, Spain; [Castells, Antoni] Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Barcelona, Spain; [Castano-Vinyals, Gemma] ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain; [Kogevinas, Manolis] ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain; [Castano-Vinyals, Gemma] Hosp Mar, Med Res Inst IMIM, Barcelona, Spain; [Kogevinas, Manolis] Hosp Mar, Med Res Inst IMIM, Barcelona, Spain; [Castano-Vinyals, Gemma] Univ Pompeu Fabra, Dept Expt & Hlth Sci, Barcelona, Spain; [Kogevinas, Manolis] Univ Pompeu Fabra, Dept Expt & Hlth Sci, Barcelona, Spain; [de Sanjose, Silvia] Hosp Llobregat, Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol & Res Program, Barcelona, Spain; [del Campo, Rosa] Red Espanola Invest Patol Infecciosa, Spanish Network Res Infect Dis, Seville, Spain; "Accion Transversal del Cancer"; Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP); Instituto de Salud Carlos III grants; FEDER funds-a way to build Europe; Fundacion Marques de Valdecilla; Catalan Government DURSI; Junta de Castilla y Leon; Consejeria de Salud of the Junta de Andalucia; Regional Government of the Basque Country; Conselleria de Sanitat of the Generalitat Valenciana
    Background: Several studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), while others have not confirmed this hypothesis. This work aimed to assess the relation of CRC with H. pylori seropositivity and with seropositivity to 16 H. pylori proteins, in the MultiCase-Control study, MCC-Spain.Methods: MCC-Spain is a multicase-control study carried out in Spain from 2008 to 2013. In total, 2,140 histologically-confirmed incident CRC cases and 4,098 population-based controls were recruited. Controls were frequency-matched by sex, age, and province. Epidemiological data were collected through a questionnaire fulfilled by face-to-face interviews and a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire. Seroreactivities against 16 H. pylori proteins were determined in 1,488 cases and 2,495 controls using H. pylori multiplex serology. H. pylori seropositivity was defined as positivity to >= 4 proteins. Multivariable logistic regression mixed models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with increased CRC risk (OR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.71-1.16). Among H. pylori seropositive subjects, seropositivity to Cag delta showed a lower CRC risk, and risk decreased with increasing number of proteins seropositive. Seropositivity to the most recognized virulence factors, CagA and VacA, was not associated with a higher CRC risk. No statistically significant heterogeneity was identified among tumor sites, although inverse relations were stronger for left colon cancer. An interaction with age and sex was found: H. pylori seropositivity was associated with a lower CRC risk in men younger than 65 and with a higher risk in older women.Conclusions: Our results suggest that neither H. pylori seropositivity, nor seropositivity to the virulence factor CagA are associated with a higher CRC risk. A possible effect modification by age and sex was identified.
  • Publication
    Treatment satisfaction with injectable disease-modifying therapies in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (the STICK study)
    (Public library science, 2017-10-19) Fernandez, Oscar; Duran, Eduardo; Ayuso, Teresa; Hernandez, Luis; Bonaventura, Inmaculada; Forner, Mireia; STICK Study Investigators Grp; [Fernandez, Oscar] Reg Univ Hosp, Inst Biomed Res IBIMA, Malaga, Spain; [Duran, Eduardo] Juan Ramon Jimenez Infanta Elena Hosp, Huelva, Spain; [Ayuso, Teresa] Navarra Hosp, Pamplona, Spain; [Hernandez, Luis] Leon Hosp, Leon, Spain; [Bonaventura, Inmaculada] Mutua Terrassa, Terrassa, Spain; [Forner, Mireia] Sanofi Genzyme, Barcelona, Spain; Sanofi Genzyme
    BackgroundTreatment satisfaction in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) may impact adherence and thus clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to measure the satisfaction of patients with RRMS with injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) and to evaluate the factors associated with treatment satisfaction.Material and methodsIn this observational retrospective study conducted in the neurology departments of 35 hospitals throughout Spain, demographic data, disease characteristics, and information on treatment with injectable DMTs were collected at a single scheduled visit. Treatment satisfaction was assessed using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM), version 1.4. Patients also answered complementary questions about the factors that might affect treatment satisfaction. The data collected were analyzed descriptively. A regression model was used to explore the factors associated with treatment satisfaction.ResultsThe study included 445 patients (mean +/- SD age, 41 +/- 10.2 years; two-thirds women). The percentages treated with each DMT were Avonex 28.5%, Rebif 44 mu g 24.5%, Copaxone 22.5%, Betaferon 13.0%, Rebif22 mu g 8.3% and Extavia 3.1%. The mean +/- SD overall satisfaction according to the TSQM was 68.8 +/- 18.6 and the highest overall satisfaction was reported for Rebif 22 mu g (72.4 +/- 20.3) and the lowest for Extavia (61.7 +/- 23.7). In the regression analysis, rehabilitation, interference with social life, pain on injection and number of MS treatments received were significantly associated with a decrease in overall TSMQ score. A small but significant negative correlation was found between EDSS scores and TSMQ scores (rho = -0.11, p = 0.02) and effectiveness ( rho = -0.17, p
  • Publication
    Dual Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Lamivudine vs Triple Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine or Abacavir and Lamivudine for Maintenance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Suppression: Randomized, Open-Label, Noninferiority DUAL-GESIDA 8014-RIS-EST45 Trial
    (Oxford univ press inc, 2017-12-15) Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Lagarde, Maria; Perez-Valero, Ignacio; Palacios, Rosario; Iribarren, Jose A.; Payeras, Antoni; Domingo, Pere; Sanz, Jose; Cervero, Miguel; Curran, Adrian; Rodriguez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Tellez, Maria J.; Ryan, Pablo; Barrufet, Pilar; Knobel, Hernando; Rivero, Antonio; Alejos, Belen; Yllescas, Maria; Arribas, Jose R.; DUAL-GESIDA-8014-RIS-EST45 Study G; [Pulido, Federico] UCM, Imas12, Hosp Univ Doce Octubre, Madrid, Spain; [Lagarde, Maria] UCM, Imas12, Hosp Univ Doce Octubre, Madrid, Spain; [Ribera, Esteban] Hosp Univ Vall dHebron, Barcelona, Spain; [Curran, Adrian] Hosp Univ Vall dHebron, Barcelona, Spain; [Perez-Valero, Ignacio] Hosp La Paz, IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain; [Arribas, Jose R.] Hosp La Paz, IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain; [Palacios, Rosario] Hosp Clin Univ Virgen de la Victoria, IBIMA, Malaga, Spain; [Iribarren, Jose A.] Hosp Univ Donostia, Inst Invest BioDonostia, San Sebastian, Spain; [Payeras, Antoni] Hosp Son Llatzer, Palma De Mallorca, Spain; [Domingo, Pere] Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; [Sanz, Jose] Hosp Principe Asturias, Madrid, Spain; [Cervero, Miguel] Hosp Univ Severo Ochoa, Madrid, Spain; [Rodriguez-Gomez, Francisco J.] Hosp Infanta Elena, Huelva, Spain; [Tellez, Maria J.] Hosp Clin Madrid, Madrid, Spain; [Ryan, Pablo] Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Madrid, Spain; [Barrufet, Pilar] Hosp Mataro, Barcelona, Spain; [Knobel, Hernando] Hosp del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; [Rivero, Antonio] Hosp Univ Reina Sofia, IMIBIC, Cordoba, Spain; [Alejos, Belen] Ctr Nacl Epidemiol, Madrid, Spain; [Yllescas, Maria] Fdn SEIMC Gesida, Madrid, Spain; Red Tematica Cooperativa de Investigacion en SIDA; Fundacion SEIMC-Gesida; Janssen Pharmaceutical; Red Espanola de Investigacion en Sida (RIS)
    Background. Our objective was to assess the therapeutic noninferiority of dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine compared to triple therapy with darunavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleos(t)ides for maintenance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) suppression.Methods. This was a multicenter, open-label, noninferiority trial (margin 12%). Patients with HIV-1 RNA
  • Publication
    The acidophilic microalgaCoccomyxa onubensisand atorvastatin equally improve antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic protective effects on rats fed on high-fat diets
    (Springer, 2020-10-06) Navarro, Francisco; Toimil, Alberto; Ramirez, Sara; Montero, Yina; Luis Fuentes, Juan; Perona, Javier S.; Angel Castano, Miguel; Pasaro, Rosario; Vega, Jose M.; Vilchez, Carlos; [Navarro, Francisco] Univ Huelva, RENSMA, Dept Integrated Sci, Cell Biol, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Toimil, Alberto] Univ Huelva, RENSMA, Dept Integrated Sci, Cell Biol, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Navarro, Francisco] Univ Huelva, Fac Expt Sci, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Toimil, Alberto] Univ Huelva, Fac Expt Sci, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Ramirez, Sara] Univ Huelva, Fac Expt Sci, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Ramirez, Sara] Univ Huelva, RENSMA, Dept Chem, Huelva, Spain; [Montero, Yina] Univ Cartagena, Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Environm & Computat Chem Grp, Zaragocilla Campus, Cartagena 130015, Colombia; [Luis Fuentes, Juan] Univ Huelva, RENSMA, CIDERTA, Algal Biotechnol Grp, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Vilchez, Carlos] Univ Huelva, RENSMA, CIDERTA, Algal Biotechnol Grp, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Luis Fuentes, Juan] Univ Huelva, Fac Sci, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Vilchez, Carlos] Univ Huelva, Fac Sci, Huelva 21007, Spain; [Perona, Javier S.] CSIC, Inst Grasa, Seville, Spain; [Angel Castano, Miguel] Hosp Huelva Infanta Elena, Huelva, Spain; [Pasaro, Rosario] Univ Seville, Fac Biol, Dept Physiol, Seville, Spain; [Vega, Jose M.] Univ Seville, Fac Chem, Dept Plant Biochem & Mol Biol, Seville, Spain; Andalusian Government; University of Huelva
    Biomass of the acidophilic green algaCoccomyxa onubensismay be used as a food source for animals without collateral toxic effects, as diet supplemented the microalga has significant hypoglycemic and hypocholesterolemic effects on healthy animals. Rats were fed for 108 days with a high-fat diet, and at the end of the experiment, they were overweight and had significantly increased serum levels of glucose (2.0-fold), total cholesterol (1.6-fold), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (7.7-fold). The supplement ofC. onubensispowder (6.25% w/w dry weight) in the high-fat diet significantly protected the rats against cardiovascular risks by reducing the serum levels of glucose (38.47%), total cholesterol (22.65%), and LDL-cholesterol (26.70%). The protective effects of the microalga were comparable with that of 10 mg/kg body weight per day of atorvastatin. The high-fat diet decreased both omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in the brain tissue of rats; however,C. onubensispowder could not restrict these changes. Simultaneously, the high-fat diet increased the levels of both palmitic and arachidonic (omega-6) acids in the telencephalon tissue of rats; this was prevented when microalga biomass was used in the diet of rats.
  • Publication
    Diversion Colitis and Probiotic Stimulation: Effects of Bowel Stimulation Prior to Ileostomy Closure.
    (2021-06-25) Rodríguez-Padilla, Ángela; Morales-Martín, Germán; Pérez-Quintero, Rocío; Rada-Morgades, Ricardo; Gómez-Salgado, Juan; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos
    Background: Diversion colitis is a non-specific inflammation of a defunctionalised segment of the colon after a temporary stoma has been performed. This inflammation is associated with a change in the colonic flora. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative stimulation of the efferent loop with probiotics prior to closure of the protective ileostomy in patients operated on colorectal carcinoma and its effect on diversion colitis. A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled study is carried out. Methods: Patients who underwent surgery for colorectal carcinoma with protective ileostomy pending reconstructive surgery and with diversion colitis as diagnosis are included. Randomised and divided into two groups. Histological and endoscopic changes were evaluated after stimulation, after restorative surgery and during the short-term follow-up after surgery. Results: Patients in CG were distributed according to the endoscopic index of severity in pre-stimulation/post-stimulation as follows: severe n = 9/9 (25.7%), moderate n = 23/23 (65.7%), and mild n = 3/3 (8.6%); compared to the distribution in SG, severe n = 9/0 (26.5/0%), moderate n = 23/3 (67.6/8.8%), mild n = 2/19 (5.9/55.9%) and normal colonoscopy in 0/12 patients (0/35.3%). Conclusion: Probiotic stimulation of the efferent loop is a safe and effective method, managing to reduce both macroscopic and microscopic colitis, as well as a decrease in symptoms in the short term after reconstructive surgery.
  • Publication
    Serological Biomarkers and Diversion Colitis: Changes after Stimulation with Probiotics.
    (2021-05-02) Rodríguez-Padilla, Ángela; Morales-Martín, Germán; Pérez-Quintero, Rocío; Gómez-Salgado, Juan; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos
    Diversion colitis is a non-specific inflammation of a defunctionalised segment of the colon after a temporary stoma has been performed. This inflammation is associated with an alteration of certain inflammatory serum markers. The aims of this study were, firstly, to evaluate the modification of inflammatory biomarkers after stimulation with probiotics prior to closure of the protective ileostomy. Secondly, to identify if a relationship could be established between the severity of diversion colitis and the alteration of inflammatory biomarkers in the blood. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study was conducted. Patients who underwent surgery for colorectal carcinoma with protective ileostomy between January 2017 and December 2018 were included, pending reconstructive surgery and with diversion colitis as diagnosis. The sample was randomly divided into a group stimulated with probiotics (SG) (n = 34) and a control group (CG) (n = 35). Histological and endoscopic changes were evaluated after stimulation, after restorative surgery and during the short-term follow-up after surgery, including the correlation with pro-inflammatory biomarkers in blood. As main findings, a significant decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP), Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR ratio), and monocyte/lymphocyte ratio (LMR ratio) was observed in the SG versus the CG with a p
  • Publication
    Diversion Colitis: Macro and Microscopic Findings after Probiotics Stimulation.
    (2021-04-06) Rodríguez-Padilla, Ángela; Morales-Martín, Germán; Pérez-Quintero, Rocío; Gómez-Salgado, Juan; Rada-Morgades, Ricardo; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos
    The use of a loop ileostomy as the defunctioning procedure of choice to protect a distal colonic anastomosis causes histological and endoscopic changes in the intestinal mucosal architecture, which have been related to chronic inflammation and changes in the microflora that consequently impact the intestinal structure and function following fecal stream diversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological and endoscopic changes on the colonic mucosa in patients with diversion colitis after stimulation of the efferent loop with probiotics prior to closure of the protective ileostomy. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study was designed. All patients who underwent surgery for colorectal carcinoma with protective ileostomy between January 2017 and December 2018 were included. These patients were pending reconstructive surgery and were diagnosed with endoscopic and histological diversion colitis. Divided into two groups, a group stimulated with probiotics (SG) and a control group (CG). 34 cases and 35 controls were included in the study. Histological and endoscopic changes were evaluated after stimulation, after restorative surgery and during the short-term follow-up after surgery. A decrease in endoscopic pathological findings (mucosal friability, mucous erosions, polyps, edema, erythema and stenosis) and in histological findings (follicular hyperplasia, eosinophils, cryptic abscesses, lymphocyte infiltration, plasma cell infiltration and architecture distortion) was observed in SG. These results were statistically significant with a p
  • Publication
    Real world effectiveness of standard of care triple therapy versus two-drug combinations for treatment of people living with HIV.
    (2021-04-08) Teira, Ramón; Diaz-Cuervo, Helena; Aragão, Filipa; Marguet, Sophie; de la Fuente, Belén; Muñoz, Maria Jose; Abdulghani, Nadia; Ribera, Esteban; Domingo, Pere; Deig, Elisabeth; Peraire, Joaquim; Roca, Bernardino; Montero, Marta; Galindo, Maria José; Romero, Alberto; Espinosa, Nuria; Lozano, Fernando; Merino, María Dolores; Martínez, Elisa; Geijo, Paloma; Estrada, Vicente; García, Josefina; Sepúlveda, M Antonia; Berenguer, Juan
    Since 1996, the standard of care (SOC) therapy for HIV treatment has consisted of a backbone of two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) paired with a third agent. Use of two-drug combinations (2DC) has been considered for selected patients to avoid toxicities associated with the use of NRTIs. This study aimed to compare the real-world outcomes of integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-containing triple therapy (TT) to dolutegravir- (DTG) and/or boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based 2DC in a large Spanish cohort of HIV patients. A retrospective analysis was performed using data from the VACH cohort, a prospective multicentre Spanish cohort of adult HIV patients. All treatment experienced patients initiating a TT of an INSTI combined with two NRTIs or a 2DC-containing DTG and/or a bPI between 01/01/2012 and 01/06/2017 were included. The unit of analysis was patient-regimens. The overall sample analysis was complemented with two sub-analyses. The first sub-analysis focused on patients treated with a backbone plus DTG compared to those treated with DTG+ one other antiretroviral. The second sub-analysis focused on patients with HIV RNA Overall 7,481 patients were included in the analysis, contributing to 9,243 patient-regimens. Patient characteristics at baseline differed among groups, with the 2DC group being significantly older and having a higher proportion of women, a longer time on ART and a higher number of previous virologic failures. Median (95% Confidence Interval [C.I.]) time to switch was 2.5 years (2.3, 2.7) in 2DC group versus 2.9 years (2.7, 3.0) in TT. Adjusted hazard ratios (95% C.I.) for discontinuation due to any reason, virologic failure and toxicity in the 2DC vs TT group were 1.29 (1.15; 1.44), 2.06 (1.54; 2.77) and 1.18 (0.94; 1.48), respectively. Results were consistent in the two sub-analyses. In this analysis, time to discontinuation and probability of remaining free of virologic failure were significantly higher in patients on INSTI-based TT compared to DTG- and/or bPI-containing 2DC, with no differences in toxicity.
  • Publication
    Postoperative Ileus after Stimulation with Probiotics before Ileostomy Closure.
    (2021-02-15) Rodríguez-Padilla, Ángela; Morales-Martín, Germán; Pérez-Quintero, Rocío; Gómez-Salgado, Juan; Balongo-García, Rafael; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos
    Loop ileostomy closure after colorectal surgery is often associated with Postoperative ileus, with an incidence between 13-20%. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative stimulation of the efferent loop with probiotics prior to ileostomy closure in patients operated on for colorectal carcinoma. For this, a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study is designed. All patients who underwent surgery for colorectal carcinoma with loop ileostomy were included. Randomized and divided into two groups, 34 cases and 35 controls were included in the study. Postoperative ileus, the need for nasogastric tube insertion, the time required to begin tolerating a diet, restoration of bowel function, and duration of hospital stay were evaluated. The incidence of Postoperative ileus was similar in both groups, 9/34 patients stimulated with probiotics and 10/35 in the control group (CG) with a p = 0.192. The comparative analysis showed a direct relationship between Postoperative ileus after oncological surgery and Postoperative ileus after reconstruction surgery, independently of stimulation. Postoperative ileus after closure ileostomy is independent of stimulation of the ileostomy with probiotics through the efferent loop. There seem to be a relationship between Postoperative ileus after reconstruction and the previous existence of Postoperative ileus after colorectal cancer surgery.
  • Publication
    Management Strategies for Antipsychotic-Related Sexual Dysfunction: A Clinical Approach.
    (2021-01-15) Montejo, Angel L; de Alarcón, Rubén; Prieto, Nieves; Acosta, José Mª; Buch, Bárbara; Montejo, Laura
    Antipsychotic medication can be often associated with sexual dysfunction (SD). Given its intimate nature, treatment emergent sexual dysfunction (TESD) remains underestimated in clinical practice. However, psychotic patients consider sexual issues as important as first rank psychotic symptoms, and their disenchantment with TESD can lead to important patient distress and treatment drop-out. In this paper, we detail some management strategies for TESD from a clinical perspective, ranging from prevention (carefully choosing an antipsychotic with a low rate of TESD) to possible pharmacological interventions aimed at improving patients' tolerability when TESD is present. The suggested recommendations include the following: prescribing either aripiprazole or another dopaminergic agonist as a first option antipsychotic or switching to it whenever possible. Whenever this is not possible, adjunctive treatment with aripiprazole seems to also be beneficial for reducing TESD. Some antipsychotics, like olanzapine, quetiapine, or ziprasidone, have less impact on sexual function than others, so they are an optimal second choice. Finally, a variety of useful strategies (such as the addition of sildenafil) are also described where the previous ones cannot be applied, although they may not yield as optimal results.
  • Publication
    Determinants of the current and future distribution of the West Nile virus mosquito vector Culex pipiens in Spain.
    (2020-06-23) Gangoso, L; Aragonés, D; Martínez-de la Puente, J; Lucientes, J; Delacour-Estrella, S; Estrada Peña, R; Montalvo, T; Bueno-Marí, R; Bravo-Barriga, D; Frontera, E; Marqués, E; Ruiz-Arrondo, I; Muñoz, A; Oteo, J A; Miranda, M A; Barceló, C; Arias Vázquez, M S; Silva-Torres, M I; Ferraguti, M; Magallanes, S; Muriel, J; Marzal, A; Aranda, C; Ruiz, S; González, M A; Morchón, R; Gómez-Barroso, D; Figuerola, J
    Changes in environmental conditions, whether related or not to human activities, are continuously modifying the geographic distribution of vectors, which in turn affects the dynamics and distribution of vector-borne infectious diseases. Determining the main ecological drivers of vector distribution and how predicted changes in these drivers may alter their future distributions is therefore of major importance. However, the drivers of vector populations are largely specific to each vector species and region. Here, we identify the most important human-activity-related and bioclimatic predictors affecting the current distribution and habitat suitability of the mosquito Culex pipiens and potential future changes in its distribution in Spain. We determined the niche of occurrence (NOO) of the species, which considers only those areas lying within the range of suitable environmental conditions using presence data. Although almost ubiquitous, the distribution of Cx. pipiens is mostly explained by elevation and the degree of urbanization but also, to a lesser extent, by mean temperatures during the wettest season and temperature seasonality. The combination of these predictors highlights the existence of a heterogeneous pattern of habitat suitability, with most suitable areas located in the southern and northeastern coastal areas of Spain, and unsuitable areas located at higher altitude and in colder regions. Future climatic predictions indicate a net decrease in distribution of up to 29.55%, probably due to warming and greater temperature oscillations. Despite these predicted changes in vector distribution, their effects on the incidence of infectious diseases are, however, difficult to forecast since different processes such as local adaptation to temperature, vector-pathogen interactions, and human-derived changes in landscape may play important roles in shaping the future dynamics of pathogen transmission.